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Boeing’s New Aircraft Becomes His Biggest Headache

WASHINGTON – The latest version of Boeing, the world’s best-selling airliner, was expected to strengthen its future for years to come. Instead, it has turned into the biggest problem in society, with more than 40 countries – including the United States, which was one of the last resisters – to ground the 737 Max 8 after a second fatal accident, AP reported Thursday.
On Wednesday, the US Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency order keeping planes on the tarmac after refusing to do so in the days immediately following the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines’ Max 8, making 157 dead.
The agency said that what made the difference was the new technology: improved satellite tracking data and physical evidence on the ground that linked the movements of the Ethiopian aircraft to those of an Indonesian aircraft Lion Air that plunged into the Java Sea in October and killed 189 people.
“This evidence aligns the Ethiopian flight closer to Lion Air, which we know to have happened to Lion Air,” said Daniel Elwell, acting administrator of the FAA.
Lion Air officials said that sensors installed in their aircraft had provided incorrect information on its last four flights, triggering an automatic dive command that the pilots failed to control during his last trip.
Since its debut in 2017, Boeing has delivered more than 350 copies of the Max in several versions that vary by size. Dozens of airlines around the world have adopted the aircraft for its energy efficiency and its utility for short and medium-haul flights.
The stranding will have a significant financial impact on Boeing, at least in the short term, said John Cox, an experienced pilot and CEO of Safety Operating Systems.
In addition to grounded aircraft, more than 4,600 Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft have not yet been delivered to airlines.
“There are delivery dates that are not being met, the use of the aircraft that is not, and all the things in the supply chain that Boeing has carefully crafted,” Cox said. “If they cannot deliver the planes, where will they put the extra engines, the extra fuselage and the extra electrical components?”
The affected airlines may also knock on Boeing’s door to claim damages. Norwegian Airlines said it would ask Boeing to be reimbursed for lost business and that if other carriers do the same, it could be expensive. The success of such airline claims depends on the details of these carriers’ contracts with Boeing, “said Dan Rose, a partner at Kreindler & Kreindler, a law firm specializing in aviation law.
“In one way or another, whether there is a contractual provision that covers it or not, there will almost certainly be claims against them,” Rose said.
(Sahar News Monitoring Desk)

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